Here is a selection of creative takes on the world of science and film for the month of July:

JURASSIC WORLD: FALLEN KINGDOM
Universal Pictures’ JURASSIC WORLD: FALLEN KINGDOM is directed by J.A. Bayona and stars Bryce Dallas Howard, Jeff Goldblum, Chris Pratt, and Daniella Pineda. Resuscitated dinosaurs from the Jurassic World theme park are under threat from an explosive volcano, and it is up to past employees of the park to decide whether to save them. Science & Film published a piece by anthropocene researcher Toby Neilson about the film and the ethics of extinction.

THE CATCHER WAS A SPY
The World War II thriller THE CATCHER WAS A SPY is based on the true story of Moe Berg, a Major League Baseball player who was catcher for the Dodgers, White Sox, and Red Sox. Berg was also a CIA agent, who was tasked with finding out whether the Germans were building an atomic bomb. THE CATCHER WAS A SPY received support from the Tribeca Film Institute-Sloan Foundation program. Starring Paul Rudd, Mark Strong, Paul Giamatti, Sienna Miller, Jeff Daniels, and Guy Pearce, it is now in theaters and on VOD platforms.


MARY SHELLEY
Haifaa al-Mansour’s biopic MARY SHELLEY stars Elle Fanning as the famous writer whose masterpiece, Frankenstein, was published exactly 200 years ago. Science & Film wrote about the scientific experiments with electricity that Mary Shelley saw at the turn of the 19th century. The film is now in theaters.

FIRST REFORMED
FIRST REFORMED stars Ethan Hawke as a pastor counseling a man who is depressed because of climate change, and is in despair at the thought of bringing a newborn child into the world. Directed by Paul Schrader (TAXI DRIVER), the film is being distributed by A24 and will show at the Museum of the Moving Image in August. Check back on Science & Film for an article by an NRDC researcher on the public health impacts of climate change.

FAR FROM THE TREE
Andrew Solomon’s bestselling book Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity has been adapted into a documentary by award-winning director and producer Rachel Dretzin (FRONTLINE). The film, like the book, asks the question: what differences should we cure, and which should we celebrate? FAR FROM THE TREE will be released into theaters by IFC on July 20.

ROOFTOP FILMS
A number of short films in the 2018 Rooftop Film Festival, taking places at outdoor locations around New York City, are science-themed including LOVE GOES THROUGH THE STOMACH by Neozoon about nutrition and the relationship of humans to eating animals.

THE HANDMAID’S TALE
The award-winning Hulu series THE HANDMAID’S TALE, adapted from Margaret Atwood’s speculative fiction novel of the same name, is now in its second season. An undisclosed environmental trauma has led to infertility amongst most women as well as men, and a totalitarian regime controls fertility. It stars Elisabeth Moss, Ann Dowd, Joseph Fiennes, Max Minghella, and Yvonne Strahovski. As part of Science & Film’s “Peer Review” commissioning series, infertility specialists Paula Amato and Judith Daar wrote about the show.


NEW GENRES AT MOMI
An new exhibition—“New Genres”—curated by Jason Eppink at the Museum of the Moving Image spans the past two decades to look at internet videos and identify the forms that are the most “significant, influential, and representational.” The exhibition is on view through September 2.

E.A.T.: OPEN ENDED AT MMCA, SEOUL
Experiments in Art and Technology, one of the most successful organizations for prompting collaborations between artists and scientists to date, was founded in 1966 by artists Robert Rauschenber and Bob Whitman alongside computer engineers Fred Waldhauer and Billy Klüver from Bell Labs. A new exhibition, “E.A.T.: Open-Ended” at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Seoul, South Korea, presents the history of the organization and the works that came out of it by Nam June Paik, Robert Breer, John Cage, Rauschenberg, and others.

KUBRICK’S 2001. 50 YEARS A SPACE ODYSSEY AT DEUTSCHES FILMMUSEUM
Marking the 50thanniversary of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY, the Deutsche Filmmuseum in Frankfurt’s exhibition features original designs, costumes, models, and production materials from the making the film from Kubrick’s archive. The Museum is holding a number of accompanying public programs, including a symposium on July 21 and 22 featuring talks on the film’s impact on computer games, and the technologically enhanced bodies featured in the film. The exhibition is on view through September 23.

This is a monthly listing of science-themed cultural offerings about town.